Why we are choosing homeschool next year

Alternatively titled: Why my daughter’s teacher is a fricken idiot!

I’ve tried to be nice about all this, I swear, I really have. It has gotten to the point where other students are now calling out the teacher during class and they are being ignored even though their answers are, in fact, correct and the teacher is wrong! Instead of ranting about all the crappy things my daughter’s teacher has done (and not done) this year. I’ll let the tests speak for themselves. These are actual questions from the tests my daughter, a second grader, has taken this year. I will mark for you the answers the TEACHER feels are the correct ones, regardless of whether or not she is correct. I have pictures of some of them, it’s starting to get cute and annoying.

Let’s start with Math: This is a hugely popular subject at our house, where my daughter had to stop learning multiplication because it was causing problems with her (second grade) teacher teaching skip counting…

1. The teacher felt the correct answer to this question was C. 2 meters. Keep in mind the very next question on the test referenced a motorcycle being 2 meters long (in the question itself). I don’t know about you, but I’ve never seen a “real medium dog” the same height as a motorcycle is long.

I love how she underlines "real" and then claims the medium sized dog to be two meters tall... For reference, that makes the average "medium dog" taller than I am.

I love how she underlines “real” and then claims the medium sized dog to be two meters tall… For reference, that makes the average “medium dog” taller than I am.

2. Kay’s plant was 6 centimeters tall. Four weeks later it was 24 centimeters tall. How much did it grow in four weeks?
A. 30 centimeters                        B. 10 centimeters
C. 28 centimeters                             D. 18 centimeters

Now despite being blatantly wrong, Sissy says a boy in her class actually confronted the teacher regarding the correct answer, which is D. 18 cm. He was told that he was wrong. Let me explain why the score is now Teacher 0, Students 2. When you ask “how much did it grow in four weeks”, you are NOT asking how tall it is now, but the rate of growth over the given timeline. SO, had she asked “How tall is it at the end of the fourth week?”, which btw, the answer still is not A because the problem states the plant was 24 cm four weeks later, asked and answered. BUT, she asked “how much did it grow in four weeks”, thus making the answer the difference between the height of the plant at the start and finish of the four weeks which is 18 cm.

3. Danny has a plant that is 6 centimeters tall. The plant grows 4 centimeters each week. How tall will his plant be in four weeks?

This one was open-ended meaning the students had to write out and solve a problem to arrive at the solution. Now for me, the plant started at 6 centimeters tall (way to go Danny Boy!), for each of the next four weeks, it grew 4 centimeters. Then it asks how tall will it be in four weeks. This means that 4+4+4+4=16, or 4×4=16, but any way you look at it, over the course of the next four weeks, Danny’s plant will gain an additional 16 cm. Add that 16 cm to his previous height of 6cm, and you arrive at the addition problem 6+16=22. Danny’s plant is now 22cm tall. Apparently, not according to Teacher but hey, I’m no teacher, I’m just a mathematics major who took a class on Differential Equations as an elective…

Score: Teacher 0, Students 3

Here’s the picture of Kay and Danny to confirm my side of the story.

But at least the kids make good gardeners. Those plants are growing pretty well... Even better when the teacher grades the test.

But at least the kids make good gardeners. Those plants are growing pretty well… Even better when the teacher grades the test.

Then there’s the problems that arise when the study guide answers don’t match the answers to the test. Pretty sure that IS a parallelogram, and unless you are studying Euclidean Geometry (at this point I’d love her teacher just to spell “Euclidean Geometry”), that one up top there, is a type of Rhombus. We’re now 0-5 to the Students.

Study guide that was given to us by the teacher for the purpose of studying.

Study guide that was given to us by the teacher for the purpose of studying.

The test. Note that the letter G is the designation for the parallelogram and that shape looks exactly like the one on the study guide and yet, Sissy still got the wrong answer.

The test. Note that the letter G is the designation for the parallelogram and that shape looks exactly like the one on the study guide and yet, Sissy still got the wrong answer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s move on to Language Arts, consisting of spelling, language, vocabulary, reading and reading comprehension. This is where it gets REALLY fun!

Two, To, Too... There is a difference and even my, then, six year old could see that.

Two, To, Too… There is a difference and even my, then, six year old could see that.

Look very carefully at this one. Notice that little circle placed randomly in the sentence, near the end there. Look close, it’s there. That’s not a random circle, that’s the letter “O”. When asked why she put it there, my then six year old, told me the word “too” needed two “o”… Why yes Folks, my then six year old was already correcting the grammar on the spelling tests. Makes a mother so proud.

Here we have "role reversal" the teacher spelled it correctly, so Sissy misspelled it for her.

Here we have “role reversal” the teacher spelled it correctly, so Sissy misspelled it for her.

Oh and when you format the spelling test so that the kids have to identify and correctly spell this weeks words, the least you could do is actually misspell the spelling word. You can’t fix what isn’t broken and you just confused the hell out of the kids, particularly the autistic child who knew the word, but still gets it wrong because her teacher failed her own test. That’s bringing us to Teacher 0-Students 7.

Let’s continue.

She got a perfect score on this homework assignment despite not following directions.

She got a perfect score on this homework assignment despite not following directions.

There’s the homework my daughter didn’t do “correctly” using the phrase “more clear” instead of the word “clearer” (which I was always taught wasn’t a word anyway) and the teacher didn’t notice. I’m half convinced she could randomly write anything in those blanks and her teacher wouldn’t know the difference.

There was the test on comparative and superlative adjectives where even the teacher wasn’t sure what she was supposed to be grading.

And yes, we get dozens of tests marked up like this one. Where correct answers are marked wrong and then fixed and then marked wrong again, but she gets the points anyway. It's confusing.

And yes, we get dozens of tests marked up like this one, where correct answers are marked wrong and then fixed and then marked wrong again, but she gets the points anyway. It’s confusing.

Or the time Teacher clearly didn’t read that weeks story and I can cite the page number and paragraph to prove it…

When you ask about a specific from the story it helps to READ THE STORY!

When you ask about a specific from the story it helps to READ THE STORY!

For those without a second grade reading book at home, this is the content of page 58. If you note paragraph two, as I wrote on the test, you will find the correct answer to the question.

For those without a second grade reading book at home, this is the content of page 58. If you note paragraph two, as I wrote on the test, you will find the correct answer to the question.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And the test where multiple answers were correct. Yes, they were both smart dogs, but they were also both girl dogs. Sorry Teacher, you failed that test too.

Tara and Tiree, another story from class that involved two smart, girl dogs.

Tara and Tiree, another story from class that involved two smart, girl dogs.

 

And the one she got marked right though clearly half a verb phrase and a prepositional phrase do not equal a sentence subject.

I circled "mom" while arguing with Sissy about whether or not "mom" was the subject... It is by the way.

I circled “mom” while arguing with Sissy about whether or not “mom” was the subject… It is by the way.

 

Pay attention to sentence #6 on this one… If you have to rewrite the sentence post-exam to make the vocabulary word fit the test, you fail as a test preparer.

The vocabulary word is "descend" the word they were looking for "descent". FAIL!

The vocabulary word is “descend” the word they were looking for “descent”. FAIL!

Now I know I may see harsh, but I was a teacher before I got married. I know what goes into making a lesson plan and what goes into assigning homework and how much time it takes to grade all of this. But COME ON! My daughter’s grades are suffering because her teacher is just downright lazy. Every page of homework she brings home is a worksheet printed off the internet. These sheets come from websites I use during the summer to homeschool Sissy. I requested a meeting with the principal of the school nearly two weeks ago and haven’t heard back yet. I know there are answers on these tests that my daughter got wrong because of her disability. Plain and simple, her brain sees things very linear and I’m trying to work on that with her. There are answers she gets wrong because she truly didn’t know the answer.  And there are answers she gets wrong because her teacher is a fricken idiot!

THIS is an autism related answer. "as far as we can see" means "we see nothing else", makes sense to me.

THIS is an autism related answer. “as far as we can see” means “we see nothing else”, makes sense to me.

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12 thoughts on “Why we are choosing homeschool next year

  1. This is downright crazy. There is nothing worse than a teacher or professor that cannot admit their mistakes. I certainly hope your school system will take this seriously and deals with this “teacher” appropriately. Good luck!

    • Thank you dear. I have made a request to speak with the principal (at her urging) and have yet to hear back. At this point my daughter is asking me at least once a week if I could be her teacher. This is a child who absolutely loves school, has had a book in her hand since she was six months old. It kills me that she’s struggling and no one will listen. I’ve had nothing but problems this year. I can’t get her an IEP, a 504 and they tell me she’s not creative enough for gifted despite qualifying academically. When she was hit by a classmate (a boy at that), her teacher ignored it so I immediately called the guidance counselor who gave me the run around and that’s when I tried to set up the meeting with the principal. If my husband wasn’t deployed, I would have fought harder to withdraw her from school this year, but as soon as Tennessee Virtual Academy opens it’s enrollment for next year, we aren’t going to have to deal with this anymore. I just hope she can hang on two more months.

      I will say that about a week ago, I was contacted by the mother of an autistic boy who goes to another school in our district and she’s been facing many of the same issues I have been with my daughter. The school district as a whole seems entirely unequipped for the educational opportunities of it’s autistic population.

      • I know this whole situation must be *beyond* frustrating, but stay strong. You’re a great mom, and this deplorable school system can’t take that away from your little girl.

      • 🙂 That’s sweet. I think the biggest difference between me and the school system is I know what it’s like to live with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. I have Asperger’s Syndrome (a high function form of autism) and I know how to relate things to her to help her understand and adapt. I know her language, and they haven’t even read the book. I think if they had more people like me working in the schools or at least volunteering in them, we’d have less issues like this and all those stories about autistic kids being abused by their teachers… It’s not hard to relate to her and other kids like her, it just takes a little effort. It’s just too bad they don’t have time for her.

  2. I homeschooled my kids. You’ll never regret it.

    • We’ve been doing supplemental schooling since she was in kindergarten. She’d bring home her weekly assignments and finish them within an hour on Monday. I had to start buying workbooks and printables to coincide with what they were learning in class. When we PCSd to Virginia mid-year, her new teacher gave her assignments like connect-the-dots that went to eight points (mind you that my daughter was in kindergarten at the age of four because of her disability and need for structure and she could already count to well past one hundred). So again I took to using homeschool resources to bridge the gap where her teachers were failing her. During the summers, we also maintain a certain level of education because its better for her autistic brain to have that consistency. Between kindergarten and first grade, she learned to count money and tell time on an analogue clock. Last summer we worked more on handwriting and research skills and reading comprehension by giving her educational print outs on people, places, and things and having her answer questions and then group the questions into paragraphs. She preferred the math lol Girl loves her numbers. I don’t doubt we will have a great time together.

  3. This is unbelievable. And beyond unfair. I suspect the school is the one with the true disability if they are unable to see, hear and correct these issues and see the “educational opportunities of its autistic population.” I think your comment, “if they had more people like me working in the schools or at least volunteering in them” would be a brilliant step forward. I hope you get to meet the principal soon and that something positive comes out of this.

    • Thank you, Gina. I do have an appointment, now, for Tuesday morning. The principal called about fifteen minutes after I left the second message and accused me of being a liar when she said ‘I don’t know why you told my secretary that this was the second message. I answer all my messages and phone calls and I didn’t have one from you.’ Here she’s also calling her secretary a liar because this was the same secretary who took the first message, I spoke to last week about having not heard from Principal yet, and who said ‘I’ll take this to her right now so we make sure she sees it.’ I’m just at a loss right now. This drama has caused a fight between me and my sister in law and I deactivated my Facebook account because of it. I’m gonna spend the weekend getting my information in order for the meeting Tuesday. Sissy has to go to the endocrinologist in Nashville again today… I hate interstates.

  4. Don says:

    That is just ridiculous! How did someone so bad at grammar, geometry, math and, well, EVERYTHING, even get to become a teacher in the first place? I’m a grown freakin’ man, who regularly hears that I’m a big guy, and I’m not even 2 meters tall! And this teacher thinks an average dog is? What the hell?

    Have you approached the other parents and talked to them about it? Maybe form a group demanding the dismissal of that teacher? Taking your daughter out of class solves the problem for her, but someone who can’t even get basic questions like that correct should NOT be teaching anyone. Period. End of story.

  5. Anne Gregor says:

    At the end of the day, you get to see the best parts of your kids as they grow and learn. Simply priceless!

    Anne Gregor
    http://HomeschoolingOption.com/

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